Gun Safe Buyer’s Guide

December 23rd, 2012 | Filed under: Child Proofing, Family Safety, Home Safes, Safes and Lockboxes, Security | No Comments »

Owning a gun is a big responsibility. There are many precautions and safety issues related to gun ownership, including owning a gun safe. You can reduce the risk of harm in your home by storing your firearms in a well-constructed, secured gun safe.

You may be an expert in handling firearms and consider yourself to be gun-safe, but visitors to your home may not be, especially if there are children in the home. If they have access to your firearms, you could be putting your guests, as well as family members at risk. And did you know that in some states, if a gun is stolen from your home and used in a crime, you could be held legally responsible for any damage related to the incident?

One way to prevent potentially dangerous situations and be “gun safe,” is to keep your guns locked in a secure gun safe. Not all gun safes are the same and not all safes are designed for holding just any type of gun. With so many gun safes to choose from, you will want to make sure you choose the best, and the right safe for your gun, or collection of guns.

There are practically an unlimited number of gun safes for sale, and multiple types to choose from. With multiple gun safe manufacturers, as well as multiple makes and models, you are sure to find the one that fits your needs.

When shopping for a gun safe, here are some guidelines to follow, and specifics to look for to help you choose the right safe:

  • Shell Strength
  • Wall Thickness and interior design
  • Type of locking mechanism
  • Fire protection on inner portion of safe, especially for paper and media
  • Slide out drawers for handguns
  • External finish is rust resistant
  • Purchase a safe larger than you think you’ll need. It should be large enough to hold all of your guns - at least 58” tall by 30” wide

When installing your gun safe into your home, it’s a wise decision to choose a safe location that is easy access, and has ample lighting. You will also want to install it in area that’s free of water drainage issues; such as a basement. When installing your safe, install it away from walls to have full access of the safe door.

Use bolts to anchor the safe to the floor and consider adding a burglar alarm system to your home for added security and peace of mind. This is especially true if your gun collection is a valuable collection.

Keeping your gun collection locked in a gun safe is always the best decision. Making sure you have the proper safe for your collection is top priority. Locking your guns into a safe that is adequate in size and construction, as well as following all recommended guidelines for installation and gun storage is always the best and safest decision.


Best Reviewed Gun Safes

December 22nd, 2012 | Filed under: Child Proofing, Consumer Protection, Home Safes, Home Storage, Safes and Lockboxes, Security | No Comments »

No matter what gun safe you purchase, you want to make sure you are getting the best one for your money. Before you buy, you will want to do your research on the types of gun safes available, to find the right gun safe for you and your needs, as well as the best one for your money.

There are not only multiple brands of gun safes to choose from, but multiple types. You can choose from a freestanding floor safe, a wall safe, even an in-ground floor safe. Doing your research before you buy will help you to be sure you are getting what you need and want in a gun safe.

Reviewing gun safe reviews can help you make the most educated decision on your gun safe purchase. Some of the most popular and positively rated gun safes are:

  • Gunvault SpeedVault SV500 gun safe- For a single handgun, the Gunvault Speedvault SV500 gun safe got great reviews. It mounts in small spaces, easy to use and offers electronic entry access. The Gunvault Speedvault SV500 gun safe got great reviews.
  • SentrySafe G1459E 14-Gun Electronic Lock Safe, Black Powder Coat- The SentrySafe G1459E 14-Gun Electronic Lock Safe, Black Powder Coat received 4 1/2 stars for its features. Standing at 59.0 - Inches in height and 21 inches in width, it can store multiple weapons. It contains 3 steel live locking bolts and 3 dead bolts as well as it contains a hardened steel plate that protects from drill attack.
  • Stack-On PDS-500 Drawer Safe with Electronic Lock - The Stack-On PDS-500 Drawer Safe with Electronic Lock received great reviews for being convenient, durable and for offering a key or electronic access. It can store one gun or hold multiple smaller guns such as, 2 compact revolvers and a Compact Semiautomatic Pistol. It is durable, made of thick steel, and can be kept in smaller spaces.
  • Homak HS30103660 8-Gun Security Cabinet, Gloss Black - This gun cabinet received excellent reviews for being a very safe cabinet. It is a hard cabinet to break into. Although this is not considered a safe, but security cabinet, it can hold about 8 rifles and ammo.. It is very well secured and comes highly recommended.

Keep your gun where it belongs, in a safe. When looking for gun safes for sale, review what others are saying about the safe you are interested in to get their feedback. No matter what it is you are looking for, you can find a safe to hold your single gun, or collection of guns. With multiple types of gun safes to choose from, you can have the added security you need and want for your gun.


I’m Begging You to Lock Up Your Guns

December 17th, 2012 | Filed under: Child Proofing, Family Safety, Home Safes, Safes and Lockboxes, Security | No Comments »

Last Friday’s massacre at Sandy Point is heart wrenching. The news is so terrible that I can’t watch as the 24/7 saturation media digs every bit of flesh and detail they can from the gruesome corners of this story. I just can’t stand to watch it, or comprehend how something like that can happen.

Tragedies like this create firestorm discussions about gun ownership, access to firearms, and the Second Amendment. Unfortunately all of this conversation is too late for those poor souls killed at Sandy Point Elementary.

I understand the reasons to own and keep guns at home, sometime one “at the ready”. Home invasion crimes are often brutal, unforgiving, and happen so quickly that law enforcement can’t respond before terrible harm sometimes comes to the occupants of the home. If you feel like a home invasion is something you can talk your way out of, best of luck to you. If you feel you need a firearm, a shotgun is generally considered your best defense. (I can go into more detail “why”, if anyone is interested.)

But you only need a weapon at arms reach when you can be in control of it. At all other times, if the weapon is outside of your immediate reach and control, secure the damn thing in a safe where only the registered owner knows the combination or carries the keys on them. If you have a “collection” of firearms, you MUST disarm the ones not “at the ready” and store them unloaded, and SHOULD store ammunition separately in it’s OWN fireproof safe.

Keeping guns out of the hands of children, the mentally ill, and thieves is every law-abiding gun-owning citizen’s TOP priority. It’s wise to install a gun safe BEFORE you begin collecting weapons.

Here’s another expert tip: If you can’t afford the safe, you can’t afford the guns.

Yes, we sell gun safes at HomeSafe, and so do a lot of other vendors. I don’t care if you buy a gun safe from us or from someone else. But, if you own guns, I’M BEGGING YOU to PLEASE secure them in a gun safe with controlled access to combinations and keys. It’s your responsibility as a gun owner.


Home Safety Checklist by UL

September 16th, 2012 | Filed under: Child Proofing, Consumer Protection, Family Safety, Fireplaces & Woodstoves, Senior Safety, Slip-and-Fall | 1 Comment »

UL offers some great home safety tips. Here are our favorites, check their website for more:

  1. Sound the Alarm: Install smoke detectors on every floor of your home and carbon monoxide detectors near sleeping areas. If already installed, test them! Tip: Replace the batteries every daylight-saving time change.
  2. Avoid Overload: Check for overloaded extension cords – usage should not exceed the recommended wattage.
  3. Don’t Get Tippy: If young children are in the home, bookshelves and other furniture should be firmly secured with wall brackets to prevent tipping.
  4. Childproof, Childproof, Childproof: Check your local library or online for complete lists of childproofing suggestions. Areas of particular danger include outlets, appliances, electronics, stairs and windows.
  5. Cover Outlets: Cover all unused outlets to prevent children from sticking a finger in the socket.
  6. Keep Extinguishers Handy: Place all-purpose fire extinguishers in key locations in your home – the kitchen, bedroom and basement. Be sure to check expiration dates regularly and know how to use them safely.
  7. Go New in the Nursery: Check that all painted cribs, bassinettes and high chairs were made after 1978 to avoid potential lead paint poisoning.
  8. Put Away Medications: Take medications and medical supplies out of your purse, pockets and drawers, and put them in a cabinet with a child safety lock.

Check the UL website for more information.

What are your favorite home safety tips - post them in the comments below.


Placement of Carbon Monoxide CO Detectors Important

September 5th, 2012 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Chimneys, Fireplaces & Woodstoves, Furnaces, Water Heaters | No Comments »

Re-posting one of our most popular topics - where to place your carbon monoxide detector:

Homeowners should remember not to install carbon monoxide detectors directly above or beside fuel-burning appliances, as appliances may emit a small amount of carbon monoxide upon start-up. A detector should not be placed within fifteen feet of heating or cooking appliances or in or near very humid areas such as bathrooms.

Read the rest for more advice on installing your carbon monoxide detector.


Carbon Monoxide Detector Saves Seven Lives in Howard County, MD

October 25th, 2010 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Family Safety, Furnaces | No Comments »

Source: Oct 25, 2010 - Washington Examiner

Howard County fire officials say a home where seven Elkridge residents suffered carbon monoxide poisoning had a working carbon monoxide detector. Fire officials say several residents had made their way out of the home by the time Howard County and Baltimore County rescue units arrived just before midnight Saturday. The seven were reported in stable condition Sunday after being taken to the University of Maryland Medical Center. - AP

Baltimore Sun:

Officials praised the fact that the home had a working carbon monoxide detector.

“As in this case, a working carbon monoxide detector can mean the difference between life and death,” Howard County Fire Chief William F. Goddard III said.

Heating and cooking equipment that burn fuel can be sources of carbon monoxide.


Home Invasion and Burglary is on the Rise in Fairfax, VA

October 5th, 2010 | Filed under: Family Safety, Home Safes, Safes and Lockboxes, Security | 1 Comment »

Home invasion and burglary is on the rise. With unemployment still hovering around 10% and an economy struggling to rebound, some are turning to drastic measures. One community in Fairfax, VA has been hit over 90 times in only a couple of months.

Citizens must remain viligent and aware. The police and home owner associations will remind you to lock your doors and report and “suspicious” activity. However, there is more that you can do to protect your home and family.

At Homesafe.com you can find many articles on how to protect your valuables as well as find top-rated products for securing your home and protecting your most valuable belongings. Burglars “think like the common homeowner.” The first place they will look for money and valuables is your sock drawer. If you are serious about keeping important documents and heirlooms safe…is a safe. Home safes come in many different shapes, sizes and price ranges.

Click here for more.


Carbon Monoxide - A Clear, Odorless Gas That Goes Virtually Undetected

October 5th, 2010 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Chimneys, Consumer Protection, Family Safety, Fireplaces & Woodstoves, Furnaces, Installed Systems, Water Heaters | No Comments »

Author: Maria Richmond for HomeSafe.com

It has no smell, nor can you see carbon monoxide, yet it is very dangerous and kills several hundred people each year.

Carbon monoxide is produced by fuel burning appliances such as, gas space heaters, gas furnaces, wood burning stoves, fireplaces, gas dryers, gas ranges, ovens, even your car. If your appliance is working properly, it will not produce enough carbon monoxide to be harmful. If it is not functioning properly, carbon monoxide can leak from the appliance in amounts that can be harmful, even fatal if enough is inhaled.

Carbon monoxide is absorbed through the bloodstream. Carbon monoxide in the bloodstream makes it impossible for oxygen to be absorbed by your vital organs. When your organs are unable to have access to, nor able to utilize oxygen, they starve and become unable to function.

Children and pregnant women (the fetus) are at even greater risks of CO poisoning. Children naturally have a higher metabolic rate. This means that they require higher amounts of oxygen for their vital organs, like their hearts and brain. When CO interferes with the delivery of oxygen to these vital organs, children can suffer severe complications from CO poisoning, such as brain damage and death.

Read the rest of the article…


Carbon Monoxide Detectors - Proper Placement of Carbon Monoxide CO Detectors Important

September 30th, 2010 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Chimneys, Consumer Protection, Family Safety, Fireplaces & Woodstoves, Furnaces, Installed Systems, Poisoning, Water Heaters | No Comments »

WASHINGTON, Sept. 30 /PRNewswire/ — Proper placement of a carbon monoxide (CO) detector is important, reminds the makers of home-safety and security website HomeSafe.com (http://www.homesafe.com/coalert).

Each fall the sad news of another family that has one or more of its family members perish in their sleep from carbon monoxide poisoning repeats itself.

The real tragedy is that these deaths can be prevented if the family had the chimney checked and/or installed carbon monoxide detectors near the sleeping and living areas within the house.

If you are installing only one carbon monoxide detector, the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) recommends it be located near the sleeping area, where it can wake you if you are asleep. Additional detectors on every level and in every bedroom of a home provide extra protection against carbon monoxide poisoning.

Homeowners should remember not to install carbon monoxide detectors directly above or beside fuel-burning appliances, as appliances may emit a small amount of carbon monoxide upon start-up. A detector should not be placed within fifteen feet of heating or cooking appliances or in or near very humid areas such as bathrooms.

When considering where to place a carbon monoxide detector, keep in mind that although carbon monoxide is roughly the same weight as air (carbon monoxide’s specific gravity is 0.9657, as stated by the EPA; the National Resource Council lists the specific gravity of air as one), it may be contained in warm air coming from combustion appliances such as home heating equipment. If this is the case, carbon monoxide will rise with the warmer air.

Installation locations vary by manufacturer. Manufacturers’ recommendations differ to a certain degree based on research conducted with each one’s specific detector. Therefore, make sure to read the provided installation manual for each detector before installing.

For more information about carbon monoxide poisoning prevention and to find top-rated CO detectors for your home, visit the CO ALERT at http://www.homesafe.com/coalert.


Summer Time Chore - Check Your Furnace Chimney

July 19th, 2010 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Chimneys, Energy Efficiency, Poisoning | No Comments »

With record-breaking heat waves baking much of the country, it seems like an odd time to be thinking about your furnace or it’s chimney, but this is the season to get your furnace chimney checked by a qualified chimney sweep or furnace maintenance company. Failing to do so could cause carbon monoxide poisoning problems in a few short months when the weather turns chilly again.

Why is that?

In the spring many creatures large and small make their homes in fireplace and furnace flues, to nest or have their young in the relative comfort of the cool, quiet, and dark “cave” that is open on the roofs of many homes across the country. These creatures like birds, squirrels, raccoons and bats can bring a mess of nesting materials with them, or create a mess of droppings left behind, potentially clogging the chimney either at the top (with a bird nest) or at the bottom (near the thimble where your furnace connects).

What happens during the summer is that the young have grown, left the chimney, and left behind a potentially deadly situation for the people living in the home.

That nesting material, along with any other mess left behind, can reduce the ability of your chimney to exhaust the deadly carbon monoxide fumes generated from your furnace or non-electric water-heater. (Hint: If your furnace or water-heater uses fuel like natural gas, propane, or oil - then it creates carbon monoxide.)

If the chimney flue is partially blocked, then the odorless but dangerous carbon monoxide can escape into the home. In the worst-cases, the mess left behind may actually block the chimney completely, causing all of the carbon monoxide to dump into the home, possibly building to concentrations high enough to cause death.

Read the Rest…


Protecting Your Home From Fires

May 6th, 2010 | Filed under: Electrical, Fire Safety | 1 Comment »

Despite people feeling safest in their homes, this is where most people get injured or die in fires, according to the NFPA (National Fire Protection Agency). Nobody imagines there will be a fire in their house until it happens, so it’s vital to take all the precautions, first of all to prevent a fire from occurring, but also, to be prepared if there is a fire (despite your best efforts, you will never be able to make your home 100% fireproof). Following a few simple rules will ensure that the risk of a fire is greatly reduced, but also that you and the people you live with will not be hurt if it does happen.

Read the rest


Fire safety for your family

February 26th, 2010 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Chimneys, Consumer Protection, Family Safety, Fire Safety, Fireplaces & Woodstoves | No Comments »

Source: Children’s Hospital Boston - by LOIS LEE, MD, MPH

The city of Boston recently celebrated the fact that no citizens within the city died as a result of a house fire in 2009—the first year with no deaths since 1972, when the Fire Department started keeping records about fire-related deaths. It seems to me in 2010 that deaths from house fires should be a phenomenon of an earlier century, but sadly this is not true.

With some of the older type of housing and the various types of heating devices families use to survive the long New England winters, this is an important fact to celebrate. The use of space heaters, the presence of old electrical wiring and living with persons who smoke in the home all increase the risk of a house fire.

Read the Rest


Tips for Your Home Safe

January 28th, 2010 | Filed under: Child Proofing, Family Safety, Home Safes, Safes and Lockboxes, Workplace Safety | No Comments »

Recently your friends have been talking about their home safes. The discussions are general, non-specific. You then notice that crime seems to be increasing; after all the economy is suffering and when the economy suffers crime does increase, but why should you buy one? Really what is the point of having a safe inside of your own house? Safes are something that banks have so what is the point of having one inside your home?

Safes give you the ability to protect items within your home that possess value, be it to you or to someone else.

Do you have a will? Where are you going to store those wedding photo proofs that are irreplaceable and everyone tells you need to be put in a safe place? Do you own any expensive jewelry, precious metals or gem stones? Are there small children with access to your possessions? If you answered yes to the last question then answer this one, do you own a gun? Are you sure they a) can’t find it and b) if they do that it’s not loaded?

Read the Rest


Tips for Smoke Detectors

January 27th, 2010 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Chimneys, Family Safety, Fire Safety, Fireplaces & Woodstoves, Workplace Safety | 1 Comment »

Every 83 seconds a residential fire breaks out in the United States. Each year, residential fires injure over 39,000 American children under the age of 14. In two-thirds of these homes, the smoke detector either doesn’t work or doesn’t exist.

Statistics show that installing a smoke detector saves lives. According to the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA), “Homes with a smoke detector typically have a death rate that is 40 to 50 percent less than the rate for homes without a smoke detector.”

The NFPA sets the rules and regulations pertaining to residential smoke detectors, but most people aren’t aware of these policies. The NFPA also provides the public with information on smoke detector maintenance and when you should replace them.

Read the Full Article


Gun Cabinet or Gun Safe - Which Do You Need?

January 24th, 2010 | Filed under: Child Proofing, Family Safety, Home Safes, Safes and Lockboxes, Security | 3 Comments »

If you have guns in your home for hunting, protection or recreational shooting, you need to have somewhere to keep them. Many people love to display their guns in a beautiful gun cabinet, with a wood finish and glass doors so everyone can see them. Others choose to keep their guns in a gun safe- a locked, metal cabinet that securely stores the guns, but doesn’t display them for view. Which one is the best choice for you?

More and more people are choosing gun safes over display cabinets. A gun safe will prevent your guns from being taken out without your knowledge- which could thwart a burglar or more importantly, save a life. If you have children in your home, it’s a no-brainer- you need a gun safe to keep these weapons from being discharged accidentally or by the wrong people.

Some high quality gun safes have the security of a locked metal cabinet, with the look of wood and glass for display. These safes use a thick, tempered glass and a wood veneer, so they serve as furniture while keeping your firearms secure. You can find gun safes that resemble cedar chests or others that look just like a armoire, so you can keep your guns hidden while having a lovely piece of furniture to display.

Read the Rest


Types of Security Safes for Your Home

January 14th, 2010 | Filed under: Family Safety, Home Safes, Safes and Lockboxes, Security | 1 Comment »

If you are looking into purchasing a security safe for your home you might be surprised at the options available. There are a variety of security safes ranging from ones that can be built into your home to freestanding. Before beginning your safe shopping excursion you should first consider what you plan to put in your safe. Are you looking to store documents, jewelry, cash, electronics or other items? Knowing what you will be storing in your safe will make your purchasing decision an easier one.

Safes are used for primarily two reasons. The first, to protect your items from theft and the second to protect your items from fire. You can get safes that offer protection from one or the other or both. You will need to decide, before shopping which type will suit your needs.

Read the rest…


Things to Consider When Purchasing a Home Safe

January 6th, 2010 | Filed under: Fire Safety, Home Storage, Safes and Lockboxes, Workplace Safety | No Comments »

Most everyone has some type of valuable that should be kept some place safe. From jewelry to coin collections to important paperwork and more a home safe can be very handy for storing valuable possessions. On the search for the perfect safe for your home you will find an abundant of choices available. Here is a look at some features that you should consider high priority when choosing a safe for your home.

Home safes offer different types of protection. The main choice consumers have is whether to choose a fire proof safe, a burglar proof safe or one that protects from both. Of course within each option there are different degrees of security levels to decide on.

Read the rest…


Home Safety Appliances: Carbon Monoxide Detectors

January 2nd, 2010 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Chimneys, Family Safety, Furnaces | No Comments »

Inside this article, you will learn how serious that danger of Carbon Monoxide can be at home and at work. It is recognized as a serious health hazard, responsible for more deaths than any other form of poisoning around the world Carbon Monoxide (CO) especially dangerous because it is a combination of Carbon and Oxygen that cannot be seen, smelled, or tasted. On average, in the United States death from CO poisoning averages nearly 170 annually.

The final outcome of inhaling CO is oxygen-starvation of the body’s internal organs. As CO is taken into the lungs, it unites to the hemoglobin far more rapidly than oxygen can. This results in the failure of internal organs, as they become starved for enough oxygen to work properly. Early warning signs of poisoning include headaches, fatigue and nausea, all of which can easily be mistaken for influenza.

Read the rest…


Winter Storm: Weather outside frightful, make inside home delightful

December 10th, 2009 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Chimneys, Family Safety, Fireplaces & Woodstoves | No Comments »

Source: Orlando Examiner

With the current winter storm sweeping the nation already responsible for at least a dozen deaths, it’s not surprising people are seeking refuge in their warm homes.

But when the weather turns cold outside, things can heat up inside — sometimes a little too much, if you don’t take precautions.

Dumping nearly 20 inches of the white stuff on Madison WI, and 15 more in Green Bay, the year’s first major pre-winter snow storm swept a large portion of the U.S. this week, leaving Wisconsin in a state of emergency.

As the winter storm moved off the East Coast, it left in its wake the return of “lake effect” snow bands, lingering blustery conditions and frigid temperatures.

On Wednesday, a follow-up storm was approaching from the West, where temperatures have been lower than normal — including a record 16-degree reading in Redding, CA.

Winter storm conditions blanketing much of the nation comes with a triple-threat to household health and safety — issues related to carbon monoxide poisoning, home heating and power outages, according to the Home Safety Council.

However, while you can’t change Mother nature, you can change behavior to keep the home safe when winter blasts howl around your home.

Read the rest


Home Burglary Prevention Tips

May 6th, 2009 | Filed under: Consumer Protection, Family Safety, Home Projects, Security, Security Systems | 3 Comments »

With the economic downturn we are seeing the rise in home burglary.  According to U.S. Department of Justice statistics, an American home is broken into about every 15 seconds and a homeowner loses an average of nearly $2,000 in possessions and damages

It is said that every home is a potential target.  With that in mind ADT has listed several tips to prevent your home from becoming burglarized:

  • Make sure all hedges and shrubs are trimmed and not covering windows. Overgrown bushes and trees close to your house can be good hiding places and also are an indication that you may be away from home. However, thorny bushes beneath windows can be a deterrent.
  • Keep areas in and around the home well lit. A dark property is more attractive to burglars - most will choose not to enter a house that is well lit. Consider installing motion sensor lights outdoors and putting indoor lights on a timer. Also, install lights on other outdoor buildings, such as sheds or garages.
  • Always lock all windows and doors when you leave home. According to the Burglary Prevention Council, most home burglaries occur during the day, when people are away at work or school. Practice and remind your family to always close and lock all doors and windows when leaving the house unattended.
  • Never hide keys around the exterior of your home. Thieves look in mailboxes, under doormats and above doorways for keys. Do not make it easy for them to get into your home. If you will be out of town on vacation, leave emergency house keys with a trusted neighbor or consider a lock box if you must leave keys outside.
  • Never put your name on your mailbox or record your name on your answering machine. Thieves look for any information they can find to gain easier access. Only put the house number on your mailbox and door and say you are “unavailable to answer the phone” on the answering machine without stating your name. By turning down your phone ringer, thieves will not hear calls go unanswered - a sign no one is home.
  • Consider a monitored burglar alarm system. A recent Rutgers University study found that alarm systems are an effective deterrent, making a home less attractive to intruders. Make sure your burglar alarm system includes a loud inside alarm, detectors at all exterior doors and motion sensors in bedrooms and main living areas. Most insurance companies also offer a discount of up to 20 percent on homeowner’s policies when you install a monitored alarm.

“Right now we have the summer burglary season colliding with more desperate economic times. That makes it even more important than ever for homeowners to take steps to protect their most precious possessions - family and home.”


Home security businesses doing well during troubled times

April 4th, 2009 | Filed under: Family Safety, Safes and Lockboxes, Security, Security Systems | No Comments »

Source: The Expositor

Despite climbing unemployment and a struggling economy, there is one industry doing quite well during these troubled times.

“It’s a proven fact that burglaries go on the rise when the economy starts to go down,” said Darren McCallum, a security consultant with Security One Alarm.

While that may be true, it’s not a trend that London police are seeing locally.

“We have not seen a dramatic spike in break and enter statistics recently,” said Const. Amy Phillipo. “We have seen a slight increase so far this year, compared to last year.”

Read the rest…


Refunds for Alarm Customers

April 3rd, 2009 | Filed under: Consumer Protection, Finance, Security Systems | 1 Comment »

Source: Home Security News Blog

In Washington County in Western Maryland, more than 1,200 residents who bought home security systems from unlicensed APX salespeople last year are eligible for refunds. This is all part of a settlement between the state’s Attorney General’s Office and Salt Lake City, Utah based APX Alarm. The government claims APX had door-to-door salespeople working and selling systems in Washington County that were not licensed.

In Maryland, alarm companies and individual salespeople must be licensed, but APX representative Nathan Wilcox told The Herald Mail that company officials didn’t realize area salespeople did not have licenses. Never the less, the AG’s office says that last summer, APX salespeople circulated throughout neighborhoods and were pushy and at times would lie about area crime statistics.

Here are some of the complaints. Sheriff Douglas Mullendore said this of APX salespeople’s actions, “kind of pushing the door and walking in uninvited.” Meanwhile, one local state politician, Christopher Shank, said on APX salesperson would not leave his property. While, a few other residents complained that salespeople came and knocked on their door at night.

Read the rest…


Top 10 Home Safety Tips

April 2nd, 2009 | Filed under: Family Safety, Fire Safety, Senior Safety, Water Heaters | 1 Comment »

1. Install smoke alarms on every level of your home and outside every sleeping area. Test them monthly. If your smoke alarms are ten years old or more, replace them. If you build or remodel your home, install fire sprinklers.

2. Develop a fire escape plan for your family: Point out two exits from each room, pick a meeting spot outside, and hold a fire drill at least twice a year.

3. Always stay in the kitchen while food is cooking on the stove.

4. Keep all stairways, paths, and walkways well lit. Use railings.

5. Install grab bars in bath and shower stalls, and use a non-slip mat or adhesive safety strips inside bathtubs and showers.

6. Post the National Poison Control Hotline number (1-800-222-1222) and other emergency numbers next to
every phone in your home.

7. Install child locks on all cabinets used to store dangerous items such as poisons, matches, and lighters. Install carbon monoxide alarms.

8. Keep your water heater setting at 120°F or less.

9. Install four-sided pool fencing with self-locking and selfclosing gates. Fencing should completely isolate the pool from the home and be at least five feet high.

10. Constantly supervise children in or near bodies of water such as pools, ponds, bathtubs, toilets, and buckets.


Bed Bunker: Under-the-Mattress Storage

March 31st, 2009 | Filed under: Home Storage, Safes and Lockboxes | 3 Comments »

The Bed Bunker is a 1300lb modular secure lockbox that fits under your mattress by replacing the boxspring. Available in a variety of bed sizes, the fireproof safe is secured via a tamper proof mul-t-lock locking system. $2700-$5200.


Safe Sales Rise as Homeowners Grow Wary of Banks and Worry About Crime

March 31st, 2009 | Filed under: Safes and Lockboxes, Security | No Comments »

(source: Denver Post)

Sales of home security safes have multiplied as homeowners worry about an increase in crime tied to the economic downturn and as confidence in banks and financial institutions wavers.

Several Denver security companies are reporting that sales of home security safes have doubled since the recession deepened last fall.

“With the economy not doing as well, people are scared of theft and are concerned about their house getting broken into,” said Jennifer Wickhorst, an administrator with Englewood Lock and Safe. “Women want to lock up their jewelry, and people are using security safes for passports, checks and anything with personal information on it.”

Paul Rossman with the Arapahoe County Security Center said security businesses

“Anytime there’s an economy problem, crime rates go up and our business goes up. When things are bad, things are good with us,” Rossman said. “We’re really selling a lot of safes, and we have a hard time getting them in here. There’s a lot of demand and very little supply.”

The increase is mostly due to safes being purchased for homes, said Lenny Guida, who owns Master Security Center in Denver, which has doubled its safe sales in recent months.

“Usually, residential households mainly purchase gun safes, but now it’s home security safes,” Guida said. “The security safes they’re buying are typically lower end. People aren’t spending a ton, maybe $200 to $250 and up to about $400.”

Although customers are typically tight-lipped about why they need a safe, Rossman said, sales are frequently driven by low confidence in banks and safe deposit boxes.

That was the case for a Castle Rock woman, who declined to be named, who with her husband bought a $350 safe in November from Amazon.com.

Though the couple realize a major bank failure is unlikely, they’ve decided to secure a week’s worth of cash in the event of a disaster, she said.

“We initially thought about purchasing a safe to keep our birth certificates and passports somewhere safe and fireproof, but then we started to get more serious about it as we watched the economy,” she said. “Some of these big banks started to fail, and it became a reality for the first time in my life that I might not be able to get cash out of the ATM.

“It keeps you prepared for the unforeseeable, which has become a lot more foreseeable.”