Best Reviewed Gun Safes

December 22nd, 2012 | Filed under: Child Proofing, Consumer Protection, Home Safes, Home Storage, Safes and Lockboxes, Security | No Comments »

No matter what gun safe you purchase, you want to make sure you are getting the best one for your money. Before you buy, you will want to do your research on the types of gun safes available, to find the right gun safe for you and your needs, as well as the best one for your money.

There are not only multiple brands of gun safes to choose from, but multiple types. You can choose from a freestanding floor safe, a wall safe, even an in-ground floor safe. Doing your research before you buy will help you to be sure you are getting what you need and want in a gun safe.

Reviewing gun safe reviews can help you make the most educated decision on your gun safe purchase. Some of the most popular and positively rated gun safes are:

  • Gunvault SpeedVault SV500 gun safe- For a single handgun, the Gunvault Speedvault SV500 gun safe got great reviews. It mounts in small spaces, easy to use and offers electronic entry access. The Gunvault Speedvault SV500 gun safe got great reviews.
  • SentrySafe G1459E 14-Gun Electronic Lock Safe, Black Powder Coat- The SentrySafe G1459E 14-Gun Electronic Lock Safe, Black Powder Coat received 4 1/2 stars for its features. Standing at 59.0 - Inches in height and 21 inches in width, it can store multiple weapons. It contains 3 steel live locking bolts and 3 dead bolts as well as it contains a hardened steel plate that protects from drill attack.
  • Stack-On PDS-500 Drawer Safe with Electronic Lock - The Stack-On PDS-500 Drawer Safe with Electronic Lock received great reviews for being convenient, durable and for offering a key or electronic access. It can store one gun or hold multiple smaller guns such as, 2 compact revolvers and a Compact Semiautomatic Pistol. It is durable, made of thick steel, and can be kept in smaller spaces.
  • Homak HS30103660 8-Gun Security Cabinet, Gloss Black - This gun cabinet received excellent reviews for being a very safe cabinet. It is a hard cabinet to break into. Although this is not considered a safe, but security cabinet, it can hold about 8 rifles and ammo.. It is very well secured and comes highly recommended.

Keep your gun where it belongs, in a safe. When looking for gun safes for sale, review what others are saying about the safe you are interested in to get their feedback. No matter what it is you are looking for, you can find a safe to hold your single gun, or collection of guns. With multiple types of gun safes to choose from, you can have the added security you need and want for your gun.


How to Install a Gun Safe

December 20th, 2012 | Filed under: Child Proofing, Consumer Protection, Emergency Preparedness, Family Safety, Home Safes, Home Storage, Security | No Comments »

Once you’ve made the decision to purchase a gun safe, you’ll want to make sure you install it correctly to be sure you get the intended benefits of owning the safe. Correctly installed and used, it can be an excellent way of keeping your firearms safe and protected.

Before beginning installation, be sure to read the instructions thoroughly. Different safes may have different installation requirements, space needed for your safe; the types of tools needed for installation, and directions on how-to install it. Installing your safe correctly helps to insure you get the maximum benefits of your safe.

Most people prefer to set up their gun safe in a closet, a garage, a den or trophy room, a bedroom, or in a room designated as a safe room. Make sure you get the correct-type safe for the location where you plan to set it up.

Some guidelines for your floor safe installation are:

  • Choose a location - When choosing the location of your safe, choose a spot away from water and water related issues, such as plumbing leaks. Basements are notorious for water related issues. If you do install it in the basement, do not set the safe on a wooden pallet, off the ground. This can make it easy for a burglar to walk away with the safe. Do choose a place where two or more sides of the safe can be blocked off, like the corner of a room.
  • Get measurements - Measure the location of where your safe will be installed. Be sure there is adequate room for the safe, as well as enough room to open the door adequately enough to have easier access to your guns.
  • Keep away from combustibles - If you store combustible products, such as paint cans or aerosols, be sure to plan to install your safe away from them. Many people store products like this in a basement or the garage. Install your safe in a location that is free and clear of any combustible products.
  • Adequate lighting - Make sure there is adequate lighting where your safe will be. Although you can purchase lights for inside the safe, you will need good lighting for the outside so you can easily see the safe lock.
  • Anchor your safe - If there is an anchoring system with the safe, it’s always best to use it. Most gun safes already come with pre-drilled holes at the bottom of the safe to use as an anchoring system.

Some people prefer a wall safe. To install a wall safe, you may need a little handyman know-how. You will first need to locate the wall studs at the level you want your safe. Measure the back of the safe and draw a finished square. Use a small saw to carefully cut a hole within the penciled square. You will want to use cut pieces of a 2 by 4 for braces on top and bottom of the safe. Screw the braces into the studs and place the safe into the opening.

If you want a floor safe, you will probably want a professional to install it, due to its complexity. Wherever you install your safe, be sure there is plenty of room to open the door wide enough to easily get in and out of it.

The more prepared you are ahead of time; the more likely you will be happy with the finished product, and your gun safe.


How to Prepare Your Family for an Emergency

November 9th, 2012 | Filed under: Consumer Protection, Emergency Preparedness, Family Safety, Flooding | No Comments »

We are all witnessing a repeat of the Katrina disaster happening right now in New Jersey and New York, making many of us wonder what we could do to help protect our families if an emergency like that should shut down our normal supply lines.

You should stock your home with supplies that may be needed during the emergency period. At a minimum, these supplies should include:

  • Several clean containers for water, large enough for a 15 day supply of water (about one gallon for each person each day).
  • An emergency food supply - 15 day supply of non-perishable food.
  • A first aid kit and manual.
  • A battery-powered radio, flashlights, and extra batteries.
  • Sleeping bags or extra blankets.
  • Water-purifying supplies, such as chlorine or iodine tablets or unscented, ordinary household chlorine bleach.
  • Prescription medicines and special medical needs.
  • Baby food and/or prepared formula, diapers, and other baby supplies.
  • Disposable cleaning cloths, such as “baby wipes” for the whole family to use in case bathing facilities are not available.
  • Personal hygiene supplies, such as soap, toothpaste, sanitary napkins, etc.

You should also keep an emergency kit for your car with food, flares, booster cables, maps, tools, a first aid kit, fire extinguisher, sleeping bags, etc. that can help you make it through the night or for a few days if you travel in remote areas.


Home Safety Checklist by UL

September 16th, 2012 | Filed under: Child Proofing, Consumer Protection, Family Safety, Fireplaces & Woodstoves, Senior Safety, Slip-and-Fall | 1 Comment »

UL offers some great home safety tips. Here are our favorites, check their website for more:

  1. Sound the Alarm: Install smoke detectors on every floor of your home and carbon monoxide detectors near sleeping areas. If already installed, test them! Tip: Replace the batteries every daylight-saving time change.
  2. Avoid Overload: Check for overloaded extension cords – usage should not exceed the recommended wattage.
  3. Don’t Get Tippy: If young children are in the home, bookshelves and other furniture should be firmly secured with wall brackets to prevent tipping.
  4. Childproof, Childproof, Childproof: Check your local library or online for complete lists of childproofing suggestions. Areas of particular danger include outlets, appliances, electronics, stairs and windows.
  5. Cover Outlets: Cover all unused outlets to prevent children from sticking a finger in the socket.
  6. Keep Extinguishers Handy: Place all-purpose fire extinguishers in key locations in your home – the kitchen, bedroom and basement. Be sure to check expiration dates regularly and know how to use them safely.
  7. Go New in the Nursery: Check that all painted cribs, bassinettes and high chairs were made after 1978 to avoid potential lead paint poisoning.
  8. Put Away Medications: Take medications and medical supplies out of your purse, pockets and drawers, and put them in a cabinet with a child safety lock.

Check the UL website for more information.

What are your favorite home safety tips - post them in the comments below.


Fire is Smoke and Gas (Video Parts 1 & 2)

December 1st, 2010 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Consumer Protection, Family Safety, Fire Safety | 3 Comments »

While home sick from work today, I was channel surfing the local cable stations, and stopped when I found a compelling fire safety video concerning the dangers of smoke inhalation during a house fire.

I’ve seen a number of fire safety videos, but none as well done as this one. It was so good I actually watched it through to the end to see if I could find out who had produced it to see if it was available online.

With a little bit of help from Google, I found an announcement at the website of the Uniformed Firefighters Association (UFA) of Greater New York that has a great deal of background on the documentary. Apparently the series was produced by retired Emmy Award winning science journalist Dr. Frank Field with the help of a grant from the MetLife Foundation.

I also found that someone has uploaded the episode I watched to YouTube in two parts (part 1, part 2) - I’ve embeded them below.

It’s realistic, accurate, compelling, dramatic, and incredibly informative.

The complete collection of “Fire Is…” fire safety videos is also available for purchase at Amazon.com.


Fire is Smoke and Gas - Part One


Fire is Smoke and Gas - Part Two


Carbon Monoxide - A Clear, Odorless Gas That Goes Virtually Undetected

October 5th, 2010 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Chimneys, Consumer Protection, Family Safety, Fireplaces & Woodstoves, Furnaces, Installed Systems, Water Heaters | No Comments »

Author: Maria Richmond for HomeSafe.com

It has no smell, nor can you see carbon monoxide, yet it is very dangerous and kills several hundred people each year.

Carbon monoxide is produced by fuel burning appliances such as, gas space heaters, gas furnaces, wood burning stoves, fireplaces, gas dryers, gas ranges, ovens, even your car. If your appliance is working properly, it will not produce enough carbon monoxide to be harmful. If it is not functioning properly, carbon monoxide can leak from the appliance in amounts that can be harmful, even fatal if enough is inhaled.

Carbon monoxide is absorbed through the bloodstream. Carbon monoxide in the bloodstream makes it impossible for oxygen to be absorbed by your vital organs. When your organs are unable to have access to, nor able to utilize oxygen, they starve and become unable to function.

Children and pregnant women (the fetus) are at even greater risks of CO poisoning. Children naturally have a higher metabolic rate. This means that they require higher amounts of oxygen for their vital organs, like their hearts and brain. When CO interferes with the delivery of oxygen to these vital organs, children can suffer severe complications from CO poisoning, such as brain damage and death.

Read the rest of the article…


Carbon Monoxide Detectors - Proper Placement of Carbon Monoxide CO Detectors Important

September 30th, 2010 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Chimneys, Consumer Protection, Family Safety, Fireplaces & Woodstoves, Furnaces, Installed Systems, Poisoning, Water Heaters | No Comments »

WASHINGTON, Sept. 30 /PRNewswire/ — Proper placement of a carbon monoxide (CO) detector is important, reminds the makers of home-safety and security website HomeSafe.com (http://www.homesafe.com/coalert).

Each fall the sad news of another family that has one or more of its family members perish in their sleep from carbon monoxide poisoning repeats itself.

The real tragedy is that these deaths can be prevented if the family had the chimney checked and/or installed carbon monoxide detectors near the sleeping and living areas within the house.

If you are installing only one carbon monoxide detector, the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) recommends it be located near the sleeping area, where it can wake you if you are asleep. Additional detectors on every level and in every bedroom of a home provide extra protection against carbon monoxide poisoning.

Homeowners should remember not to install carbon monoxide detectors directly above or beside fuel-burning appliances, as appliances may emit a small amount of carbon monoxide upon start-up. A detector should not be placed within fifteen feet of heating or cooking appliances or in or near very humid areas such as bathrooms.

When considering where to place a carbon monoxide detector, keep in mind that although carbon monoxide is roughly the same weight as air (carbon monoxide’s specific gravity is 0.9657, as stated by the EPA; the National Resource Council lists the specific gravity of air as one), it may be contained in warm air coming from combustion appliances such as home heating equipment. If this is the case, carbon monoxide will rise with the warmer air.

Installation locations vary by manufacturer. Manufacturers’ recommendations differ to a certain degree based on research conducted with each one’s specific detector. Therefore, make sure to read the provided installation manual for each detector before installing.

For more information about carbon monoxide poisoning prevention and to find top-rated CO detectors for your home, visit the CO ALERT at http://www.homesafe.com/coalert.


Fire safety for your family

February 26th, 2010 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Chimneys, Consumer Protection, Family Safety, Fire Safety, Fireplaces & Woodstoves | No Comments »

Source: Children’s Hospital Boston - by LOIS LEE, MD, MPH

The city of Boston recently celebrated the fact that no citizens within the city died as a result of a house fire in 2009—the first year with no deaths since 1972, when the Fire Department started keeping records about fire-related deaths. It seems to me in 2010 that deaths from house fires should be a phenomenon of an earlier century, but sadly this is not true.

With some of the older type of housing and the various types of heating devices families use to survive the long New England winters, this is an important fact to celebrate. The use of space heaters, the presence of old electrical wiring and living with persons who smoke in the home all increase the risk of a house fire.

Read the Rest


The Growing Problem of Texting While Driving

December 10th, 2009 | Filed under: Consumer Protection, Driving Safety | No Comments »

Utah Department of Transportation and its public safety partners have created a program called Zero Fatalities, and recently released a powerful 15-minute documentary addressing the growing problem of texting while driving today. View the video below.

The intent is to alter the public’s current perception that traffic fatalities are an inevitable reality that must be accepted. Instead, by making minor changes to our driving behaviors, our roads will become safer for drivers and passengers. We can prevent the deaths of thousands of people.

Traffic fatalities are preventable - not inevitable, yet they are the leading cause of death for children, for teens, and for everyone between 3 and 33 years old. In fact, according to the National Safety Council, your chance of dying in a car crash sometime in your life is one in 84. How many crashes can be prevented each year if everyone in the car is properly restrained, or not drunk, or drowsy, or speeding?

There are techniques and emerging technologies that can help remind drivers to ignore their phone and text messages while driving.

(Read More…)


Preventing Child Injuries During Home Safety Month

June 29th, 2009 | Filed under: Child Proofing, Consumer Protection, Family Safety, Senior Safety | 1 Comment »

More than 9 million children between birth and age 19 are seen for injuries each year in U.S. emergency departments, and injuries are the leading cause of death among children in this age group.

During Home Safety Month —and all year—take some simple hands-on steps to make your home safer. You can protect the ones you love by preventing child injuries at home.

Learn more about it here.


Home Burglary Prevention Tips

May 6th, 2009 | Filed under: Consumer Protection, Family Safety, Home Projects, Security, Security Systems | 3 Comments »

With the economic downturn we are seeing the rise in home burglary.  According to U.S. Department of Justice statistics, an American home is broken into about every 15 seconds and a homeowner loses an average of nearly $2,000 in possessions and damages

It is said that every home is a potential target.  With that in mind ADT has listed several tips to prevent your home from becoming burglarized:

  • Make sure all hedges and shrubs are trimmed and not covering windows. Overgrown bushes and trees close to your house can be good hiding places and also are an indication that you may be away from home. However, thorny bushes beneath windows can be a deterrent.
  • Keep areas in and around the home well lit. A dark property is more attractive to burglars - most will choose not to enter a house that is well lit. Consider installing motion sensor lights outdoors and putting indoor lights on a timer. Also, install lights on other outdoor buildings, such as sheds or garages.
  • Always lock all windows and doors when you leave home. According to the Burglary Prevention Council, most home burglaries occur during the day, when people are away at work or school. Practice and remind your family to always close and lock all doors and windows when leaving the house unattended.
  • Never hide keys around the exterior of your home. Thieves look in mailboxes, under doormats and above doorways for keys. Do not make it easy for them to get into your home. If you will be out of town on vacation, leave emergency house keys with a trusted neighbor or consider a lock box if you must leave keys outside.
  • Never put your name on your mailbox or record your name on your answering machine. Thieves look for any information they can find to gain easier access. Only put the house number on your mailbox and door and say you are “unavailable to answer the phone” on the answering machine without stating your name. By turning down your phone ringer, thieves will not hear calls go unanswered - a sign no one is home.
  • Consider a monitored burglar alarm system. A recent Rutgers University study found that alarm systems are an effective deterrent, making a home less attractive to intruders. Make sure your burglar alarm system includes a loud inside alarm, detectors at all exterior doors and motion sensors in bedrooms and main living areas. Most insurance companies also offer a discount of up to 20 percent on homeowner’s policies when you install a monitored alarm.

“Right now we have the summer burglary season colliding with more desperate economic times. That makes it even more important than ever for homeowners to take steps to protect their most precious possessions - family and home.”


Refunds for Alarm Customers

April 3rd, 2009 | Filed under: Consumer Protection, Finance, Security Systems | 1 Comment »

Source: Home Security News Blog

In Washington County in Western Maryland, more than 1,200 residents who bought home security systems from unlicensed APX salespeople last year are eligible for refunds. This is all part of a settlement between the state’s Attorney General’s Office and Salt Lake City, Utah based APX Alarm. The government claims APX had door-to-door salespeople working and selling systems in Washington County that were not licensed.

In Maryland, alarm companies and individual salespeople must be licensed, but APX representative Nathan Wilcox told The Herald Mail that company officials didn’t realize area salespeople did not have licenses. Never the less, the AG’s office says that last summer, APX salespeople circulated throughout neighborhoods and were pushy and at times would lie about area crime statistics.

Here are some of the complaints. Sheriff Douglas Mullendore said this of APX salespeople’s actions, “kind of pushing the door and walking in uninvited.” Meanwhile, one local state politician, Christopher Shank, said on APX salesperson would not leave his property. While, a few other residents complained that salespeople came and knocked on their door at night.

Read the rest…