Gun Safe Buyer’s Guide

December 23rd, 2012 | Filed under: Child Proofing, Family Safety, Home Safes, Safes and Lockboxes, Security | No Comments »

Owning a gun is a big responsibility. There are many precautions and safety issues related to gun ownership, including owning a gun safe. You can reduce the risk of harm in your home by storing your firearms in a well-constructed, secured gun safe.

You may be an expert in handling firearms and consider yourself to be gun-safe, but visitors to your home may not be, especially if there are children in the home. If they have access to your firearms, you could be putting your guests, as well as family members at risk. And did you know that in some states, if a gun is stolen from your home and used in a crime, you could be held legally responsible for any damage related to the incident?

One way to prevent potentially dangerous situations and be “gun safe,” is to keep your guns locked in a secure gun safe. Not all gun safes are the same and not all safes are designed for holding just any type of gun. With so many gun safes to choose from, you will want to make sure you choose the best, and the right safe for your gun, or collection of guns.

There are practically an unlimited number of gun safes for sale, and multiple types to choose from. With multiple gun safe manufacturers, as well as multiple makes and models, you are sure to find the one that fits your needs.

When shopping for a gun safe, here are some guidelines to follow, and specifics to look for to help you choose the right safe:

  • Shell Strength
  • Wall Thickness and interior design
  • Type of locking mechanism
  • Fire protection on inner portion of safe, especially for paper and media
  • Slide out drawers for handguns
  • External finish is rust resistant
  • Purchase a safe larger than you think you’ll need. It should be large enough to hold all of your guns - at least 58” tall by 30” wide

When installing your gun safe into your home, it’s a wise decision to choose a safe location that is easy access, and has ample lighting. You will also want to install it in area that’s free of water drainage issues; such as a basement. When installing your safe, install it away from walls to have full access of the safe door.

Use bolts to anchor the safe to the floor and consider adding a burglar alarm system to your home for added security and peace of mind. This is especially true if your gun collection is a valuable collection.

Keeping your gun collection locked in a gun safe is always the best decision. Making sure you have the proper safe for your collection is top priority. Locking your guns into a safe that is adequate in size and construction, as well as following all recommended guidelines for installation and gun storage is always the best and safest decision.


Best Reviewed Gun Safes

December 22nd, 2012 | Filed under: Child Proofing, Consumer Protection, Home Safes, Home Storage, Safes and Lockboxes, Security | No Comments »

No matter what gun safe you purchase, you want to make sure you are getting the best one for your money. Before you buy, you will want to do your research on the types of gun safes available, to find the right gun safe for you and your needs, as well as the best one for your money.

There are not only multiple brands of gun safes to choose from, but multiple types. You can choose from a freestanding floor safe, a wall safe, even an in-ground floor safe. Doing your research before you buy will help you to be sure you are getting what you need and want in a gun safe.

Reviewing gun safe reviews can help you make the most educated decision on your gun safe purchase. Some of the most popular and positively rated gun safes are:

  • Gunvault SpeedVault SV500 gun safe- For a single handgun, the Gunvault Speedvault SV500 gun safe got great reviews. It mounts in small spaces, easy to use and offers electronic entry access. The Gunvault Speedvault SV500 gun safe got great reviews.
  • SentrySafe G1459E 14-Gun Electronic Lock Safe, Black Powder Coat- The SentrySafe G1459E 14-Gun Electronic Lock Safe, Black Powder Coat received 4 1/2 stars for its features. Standing at 59.0 - Inches in height and 21 inches in width, it can store multiple weapons. It contains 3 steel live locking bolts and 3 dead bolts as well as it contains a hardened steel plate that protects from drill attack.
  • Stack-On PDS-500 Drawer Safe with Electronic Lock - The Stack-On PDS-500 Drawer Safe with Electronic Lock received great reviews for being convenient, durable and for offering a key or electronic access. It can store one gun or hold multiple smaller guns such as, 2 compact revolvers and a Compact Semiautomatic Pistol. It is durable, made of thick steel, and can be kept in smaller spaces.
  • Homak HS30103660 8-Gun Security Cabinet, Gloss Black - This gun cabinet received excellent reviews for being a very safe cabinet. It is a hard cabinet to break into. Although this is not considered a safe, but security cabinet, it can hold about 8 rifles and ammo.. It is very well secured and comes highly recommended.

Keep your gun where it belongs, in a safe. When looking for gun safes for sale, review what others are saying about the safe you are interested in to get their feedback. No matter what it is you are looking for, you can find a safe to hold your single gun, or collection of guns. With multiple types of gun safes to choose from, you can have the added security you need and want for your gun.


How to Install a Gun Safe

December 20th, 2012 | Filed under: Child Proofing, Consumer Protection, Emergency Preparedness, Family Safety, Home Safes, Home Storage, Security | No Comments »

Once you’ve made the decision to purchase a gun safe, you’ll want to make sure you install it correctly to be sure you get the intended benefits of owning the safe. Correctly installed and used, it can be an excellent way of keeping your firearms safe and protected.

Before beginning installation, be sure to read the instructions thoroughly. Different safes may have different installation requirements, space needed for your safe; the types of tools needed for installation, and directions on how-to install it. Installing your safe correctly helps to insure you get the maximum benefits of your safe.

Most people prefer to set up their gun safe in a closet, a garage, a den or trophy room, a bedroom, or in a room designated as a safe room. Make sure you get the correct-type safe for the location where you plan to set it up.

Some guidelines for your floor safe installation are:

  • Choose a location - When choosing the location of your safe, choose a spot away from water and water related issues, such as plumbing leaks. Basements are notorious for water related issues. If you do install it in the basement, do not set the safe on a wooden pallet, off the ground. This can make it easy for a burglar to walk away with the safe. Do choose a place where two or more sides of the safe can be blocked off, like the corner of a room.
  • Get measurements - Measure the location of where your safe will be installed. Be sure there is adequate room for the safe, as well as enough room to open the door adequately enough to have easier access to your guns.
  • Keep away from combustibles - If you store combustible products, such as paint cans or aerosols, be sure to plan to install your safe away from them. Many people store products like this in a basement or the garage. Install your safe in a location that is free and clear of any combustible products.
  • Adequate lighting - Make sure there is adequate lighting where your safe will be. Although you can purchase lights for inside the safe, you will need good lighting for the outside so you can easily see the safe lock.
  • Anchor your safe - If there is an anchoring system with the safe, it’s always best to use it. Most gun safes already come with pre-drilled holes at the bottom of the safe to use as an anchoring system.

Some people prefer a wall safe. To install a wall safe, you may need a little handyman know-how. You will first need to locate the wall studs at the level you want your safe. Measure the back of the safe and draw a finished square. Use a small saw to carefully cut a hole within the penciled square. You will want to use cut pieces of a 2 by 4 for braces on top and bottom of the safe. Screw the braces into the studs and place the safe into the opening.

If you want a floor safe, you will probably want a professional to install it, due to its complexity. Wherever you install your safe, be sure there is plenty of room to open the door wide enough to easily get in and out of it.

The more prepared you are ahead of time; the more likely you will be happy with the finished product, and your gun safe.


I’m Begging You to Lock Up Your Guns

December 17th, 2012 | Filed under: Child Proofing, Family Safety, Home Safes, Safes and Lockboxes, Security | No Comments »

Last Friday’s massacre at Sandy Point is heart wrenching. The news is so terrible that I can’t watch as the 24/7 saturation media digs every bit of flesh and detail they can from the gruesome corners of this story. I just can’t stand to watch it, or comprehend how something like that can happen.

Tragedies like this create firestorm discussions about gun ownership, access to firearms, and the Second Amendment. Unfortunately all of this conversation is too late for those poor souls killed at Sandy Point Elementary.

I understand the reasons to own and keep guns at home, sometime one “at the ready”. Home invasion crimes are often brutal, unforgiving, and happen so quickly that law enforcement can’t respond before terrible harm sometimes comes to the occupants of the home. If you feel like a home invasion is something you can talk your way out of, best of luck to you. If you feel you need a firearm, a shotgun is generally considered your best defense. (I can go into more detail “why”, if anyone is interested.)

But you only need a weapon at arms reach when you can be in control of it. At all other times, if the weapon is outside of your immediate reach and control, secure the damn thing in a safe where only the registered owner knows the combination or carries the keys on them. If you have a “collection” of firearms, you MUST disarm the ones not “at the ready” and store them unloaded, and SHOULD store ammunition separately in it’s OWN fireproof safe.

Keeping guns out of the hands of children, the mentally ill, and thieves is every law-abiding gun-owning citizen’s TOP priority. It’s wise to install a gun safe BEFORE you begin collecting weapons.

Here’s another expert tip: If you can’t afford the safe, you can’t afford the guns.

Yes, we sell gun safes at HomeSafe, and so do a lot of other vendors. I don’t care if you buy a gun safe from us or from someone else. But, if you own guns, I’M BEGGING YOU to PLEASE secure them in a gun safe with controlled access to combinations and keys. It’s your responsibility as a gun owner.


Home Safety Checklist by UL

September 16th, 2012 | Filed under: Child Proofing, Consumer Protection, Family Safety, Fireplaces & Woodstoves, Senior Safety, Slip-and-Fall | 1 Comment »

UL offers some great home safety tips. Here are our favorites, check their website for more:

  1. Sound the Alarm: Install smoke detectors on every floor of your home and carbon monoxide detectors near sleeping areas. If already installed, test them! Tip: Replace the batteries every daylight-saving time change.
  2. Avoid Overload: Check for overloaded extension cords – usage should not exceed the recommended wattage.
  3. Don’t Get Tippy: If young children are in the home, bookshelves and other furniture should be firmly secured with wall brackets to prevent tipping.
  4. Childproof, Childproof, Childproof: Check your local library or online for complete lists of childproofing suggestions. Areas of particular danger include outlets, appliances, electronics, stairs and windows.
  5. Cover Outlets: Cover all unused outlets to prevent children from sticking a finger in the socket.
  6. Keep Extinguishers Handy: Place all-purpose fire extinguishers in key locations in your home – the kitchen, bedroom and basement. Be sure to check expiration dates regularly and know how to use them safely.
  7. Go New in the Nursery: Check that all painted cribs, bassinettes and high chairs were made after 1978 to avoid potential lead paint poisoning.
  8. Put Away Medications: Take medications and medical supplies out of your purse, pockets and drawers, and put them in a cabinet with a child safety lock.

Check the UL website for more information.

What are your favorite home safety tips - post them in the comments below.


Wonderful Internet Safety Sites for Parents, Educators, and Children

March 10th, 2010 | Filed under: Child Proofing, Family Safety, Internet Safety | No Comments »

The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children and Boys & Girls Clubs of America have created a great site for parents regarding internet safety. There’s an interactive section designed just for kids, and information for parents, law enforcement, and teachers.

Visit the main site: http://www.netsmartz.org/index.aspx

Children’s site: http://www.netsmartzkids.org/indexFL.htm

Educators site: http://www.netsmartz.org/educators.htm


Tips for Your Home Safe

January 28th, 2010 | Filed under: Child Proofing, Family Safety, Home Safes, Safes and Lockboxes, Workplace Safety | No Comments »

Recently your friends have been talking about their home safes. The discussions are general, non-specific. You then notice that crime seems to be increasing; after all the economy is suffering and when the economy suffers crime does increase, but why should you buy one? Really what is the point of having a safe inside of your own house? Safes are something that banks have so what is the point of having one inside your home?

Safes give you the ability to protect items within your home that possess value, be it to you or to someone else.

Do you have a will? Where are you going to store those wedding photo proofs that are irreplaceable and everyone tells you need to be put in a safe place? Do you own any expensive jewelry, precious metals or gem stones? Are there small children with access to your possessions? If you answered yes to the last question then answer this one, do you own a gun? Are you sure they a) can’t find it and b) if they do that it’s not loaded?

Read the Rest


Gun Cabinet or Gun Safe - Which Do You Need?

January 24th, 2010 | Filed under: Child Proofing, Family Safety, Home Safes, Safes and Lockboxes, Security | 3 Comments »

If you have guns in your home for hunting, protection or recreational shooting, you need to have somewhere to keep them. Many people love to display their guns in a beautiful gun cabinet, with a wood finish and glass doors so everyone can see them. Others choose to keep their guns in a gun safe- a locked, metal cabinet that securely stores the guns, but doesn’t display them for view. Which one is the best choice for you?

More and more people are choosing gun safes over display cabinets. A gun safe will prevent your guns from being taken out without your knowledge- which could thwart a burglar or more importantly, save a life. If you have children in your home, it’s a no-brainer- you need a gun safe to keep these weapons from being discharged accidentally or by the wrong people.

Some high quality gun safes have the security of a locked metal cabinet, with the look of wood and glass for display. These safes use a thick, tempered glass and a wood veneer, so they serve as furniture while keeping your firearms secure. You can find gun safes that resemble cedar chests or others that look just like a armoire, so you can keep your guns hidden while having a lovely piece of furniture to display.

Read the Rest


Great Fire Safety Website: Be Fire Smart

July 10th, 2009 | Filed under: Child Proofing, Family Safety, Fire Safety | 6 Comments »

Liberty Mutual’s “Be Fire Smart” site is a great resource for fire safety information, presented in a fun and interactive way. There are separate sections for parents, teachers, and children - covering a variety of fire-safety and prevention topics. On the site you will find information on planning fire escape routes, tips for preventing fires, and other home safety information - most of it interactive or using video.

There are also fun ways to teach kids about fire safety, including:

  • Download and print the Be Fire Smart coloring book.
  • Learn what all of the firefighting gear is called, and what it is used for.
  • Play a game called “How Fast Can You Spot Trouble”.

If you are a parent, be sure to review this information yourself to make sure you know how to keep your home and family safe from fire. Use the teaching tools to help your kids understand important safety tips.  

If you are a teacher, they have a wide variety of teaching materials available to you, including complete lesson plans for fire safety awareness.

Great Site! Way to go Liberty Mutual!


Preventing Child Injuries During Home Safety Month

June 29th, 2009 | Filed under: Child Proofing, Consumer Protection, Family Safety, Senior Safety | 1 Comment »

More than 9 million children between birth and age 19 are seen for injuries each year in U.S. emergency departments, and injuries are the leading cause of death among children in this age group.

During Home Safety Month —and all year—take some simple hands-on steps to make your home safer. You can protect the ones you love by preventing child injuries at home.

Learn more about it here.


Help Keep Your Child Safe - Take 25 Minutes to Educate

April 22nd, 2009 | Filed under: Child Proofing, Family Safety, Poisoning | 3 Comments »

The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children encourages families to “Take 25“, to sit down with your children for just 25 minutes - talking to kids about ways to be safer. On their site you can find educational materials for parents, and tips on how to talk with your kids about these sensitive subjects.

They offer 25 tips to help you get the conversation started, including:

  1. Teach your children their full names, address, and home telephone number. Make sure they know your full name.
  2. Make sure your children know how to reach you at work or on your cell phone.
  3. Teach your children how and when to use 911 and make sure your children have a trusted adult to call if they’re scared or have an emergency.
  4. Instruct children to keep the door locked and not to open the door to talk to anyone when they are home alone. Set rules with your children about having visitors over when you’re not home and how to answer the telephone.
  5. Choose babysitters with care. Obtain references from family, friends, and neighbors. Once you have chosen the caregiver, drop in unexpectedly to see how your children are doing. Ask children how the experience with the caregiver was and listen carefully to their responses.

Take 25 was started to commemorate National Missing Children’s Day on May 25th. First proclaimed by President Ronald Reagan in 1983, the day serves as an annual reminder to the nation to renew efforts to reunite missing children with their families, remember those who are still missing, and make child protection a national priority. It’s a time of reflection and renewed hope for millions of families in communities across the country.

Additional Resources:

Take 25 minutes to visit the site right now.

  


    Free “Mr. Yuk” Stickers

    April 20th, 2009 | Filed under: Child Proofing, Family Safety, Free Stuff, Poisoning | 6 Comments »

    “Mr. Yuk” was conceived in 1971 as the mascot for the poison control center at the Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh. The original design was created by Wendy (Courtney) Brown, a grade-school student at a school near Pittsburgh Children’s Hospital.

    As part of a contest held by the poison center, Wendy drew the now-familiar face, along with a stick-figure body that was not included in the finished sticker design. Her design won, and Wendy was compensated for her time and talent with a prize: a tape recorder. Pittsburgh Children’s Hospital now owns all exclusive rights to the Mr. Yuk design. It appears on small green stickers that can be affixed to any container of poisonous substance.

    The Mr. Yuk stickers are bold and obvious. Mr. Yuk does not include details of the poisonous attributes of the contents. The logo itself is intended to be enough to dissuade children from ingesting the poisons.

    You can request a free sheet of Mr. Yuk stickers by sending a self-addressed stamped envelope to this address:

    Mr. Yuk
    Pittsburgh Poison Center 
    UPMC
    200 Lothrop Street
    BIR 010701
    Pittsburgh, PA 15213

    http://www.chp.edu/CHP/mryuk

    There are additional poison-prevention-education materials available at the Mr. Yuk web-store.


    6 Tips for Keeping Kids Safe at Home

    April 16th, 2009 | Filed under: Child Proofing, Family Safety, Security | 1 Comment »

    “As children spend more time at home during summer break, parents should ask themselves if they are doing everything they can to keep kids safe at home,” said Anne-Marie Rouse, with ADT Security Services. “It’s easy to get into vacation mode and forget about home dangers that put kids at risk.”

  • Lock up all matches and lighters and blow out candles when you leave the room or go to sleep. Never leave young children unattended near an open flame.
  • Always supervise young children around water. Never allow older siblings to supervise children in or around water.
  • To help prevent children from falling out of upper level windows install specially designed locks. Teach older children how to lock and unlock windows in an emergency.
  • Help prevent poisoning by removing all medicines from purses, pockets and drawers. Lock all medications and household products in a cabinet with a child safety lock and keep cosmetics out of reach of small children.
  • According to the Canada Safety Council, the best defense against fires, gas leaks and other emergencies is a well-rehearsed escape plan. While children are home for summer break take advantage of this time to create and practice your evacuation plan.
  • Consider a monitored home security system, including monitored smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. These can detect dangerous levels of harmful CO and smoke and then alert a monitoring center which notifies first responders, giving them vital, specific information about babies, young children, seniors and disabled people in the home. Many systems can also be programmed to “chirp” when a protected door or window is opened, which can also alert parents to a child’s whereabouts or activities.

  • Child’s Play - Top Toy Hazards

    March 16th, 2009 | Filed under: Child Proofing, Family Safety | No Comments »

    The Consumer Product Safety Commission reports the following toys which pose higher risks of injury or death.

    Top Toy Hazards

    • Scooters and Ridings Toys- The chance of serious injury increases for children not wearing helmets and other safety gear.
        
    • Toys with Small Parts- Most parents are aware of the danger of small parts on toys that can pose a choking hazard for smaller children. It is important to buy age appropriate toys and to make sure older children keep their toys out of reach from their younger siblings.
        
    • Balloons- Do not let children under 8 play with or have access to un-inflated or broken balloons as they pose a choking hazard if swallowed.
        
    • Magnets- Many popular toy manufacturers use small magnets as components of toy sets. Magnets pose a serious danger if swallowed as they can stick to each other across a bowel wall. This can lead to infection, surgery or even death. Note: Written warnings are not mandatory on toys containing magnets.
        
    • Battery chargers and adapters- As it becomes harder and harder to find toys that don’t require batteries, the need for battery chargers and adapters has grown. When unsupervised by an adult children can be exposed to the risk of thermal burns.

    Read the rest…


    Practical Tips For Baby-Proofing Your Home

    March 10th, 2009 | Filed under: Child Proofing, Family Safety | 1 Comment »

    What’s involved in a home baby-proofing project? Surprisingly enough, it’s pretty basic and most of it is common sense. Let’s do a quick room-by-room rundown, starting with the nursery or child’s room…

    Baby-Proofing The Nursery :

    • The Crib: Cribs must meet today’s safety standards set by the American Society for Testing and Material (ASTM). The crib mattress must fit snugly in the crib, leaving no gaps in between. If you can fit more than one finger between the mattress and the side rails, your mattress isn’t a good fit. Slats need to be 2 3/8 inches apart or less to prevent your baby from poking his head through. Finally, the crib shouldn’t have any decorative cutouts or elevated corner posts, as clothing could get caught on these. 
    • Crib Bedding: While there are frequent disagreements as to whether crib bumpers should or shouldn’t be used, most pediatric organizations advise against using them altogether, citing them as a suffocation risk. To further reduce the risk of suffocation, it’s best to avoid soft bedding, pillows or excess blankets. 
    • Changing Table: First and foremost, make sure that your changing table is sturdy. It should also have a safety strap and 2-inch guardrails on all sides to help prevent falls. 
    • Window Cords: Don’t keep the baby’s crib near a window, especially if that window has blinds or chords of any kind as they create a significant risk for strangulation.

    Read more tips here…