Placement of Carbon Monoxide CO Detectors Important

September 5th, 2012 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Chimneys, Fireplaces & Woodstoves, Furnaces, Water Heaters | No Comments »

Re-posting one of our most popular topics – where to place your carbon monoxide detector:

Homeowners should remember not to install carbon monoxide detectors directly above or beside fuel-burning appliances, as appliances may emit a small amount of carbon monoxide upon start-up. A detector should not be placed within fifteen feet of heating or cooking appliances or in or near very humid areas such as bathrooms.

Read the rest for more advice on installing your carbon monoxide detector.


Fire is Smoke and Gas (Video Parts 1 & 2)

December 1st, 2010 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Consumer Protection, Family Safety, Fire Safety | 3 Comments »

While home sick from work today, I was channel surfing the local cable stations, and stopped when I found a compelling fire safety video concerning the dangers of smoke inhalation during a house fire.

I’ve seen a number of fire safety videos, but none as well done as this one. It was so good I actually watched it through to the end to see if I could find out who had produced it to see if it was available online.

With a little bit of help from Google, I found an announcement at the website of the Uniformed Firefighters Association (UFA) of Greater New York that has a great deal of background on the documentary. Apparently the series was produced by retired Emmy Award winning science journalist Dr. Frank Field with the help of a grant from the MetLife Foundation.

I also found that someone has uploaded the episode I watched to YouTube in two parts (part 1, part 2) – I’ve embeded them below.

It’s realistic, accurate, compelling, dramatic, and incredibly informative.

The complete collection of “Fire Is…” fire safety videos is also available for purchase at Amazon.com.


Fire is Smoke and Gas – Part One


Fire is Smoke and Gas – Part Two


Seven people taken to local hospital due to carbon monoxide exposure in Green Bay, WI

October 25th, 2010 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Family Safety, Poisoning | 1 Comment »

Source: WFRV News

GREEN BAY, Wi–(WFRV) The Green Bay Fire Department responded to a carbon monoxide call on Saturday evening at 10:42 pm. The home residence, 1600 Farlin Avenue, recorded very high levels of CO.

Five children and two adults were transported to the hospital for CO exposure.

The Green Bay Fire Department says the CO was ventilated from the home.

The fire department says the source of the CO was produced from a generator running in the garage used to supply power for lights and heat.


Carbon Monoxide Detector Saves Seven Lives in Howard County, MD

October 25th, 2010 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Family Safety, Furnaces | No Comments »

Source: Oct 25, 2010 – Washington Examiner

Howard County fire officials say a home where seven Elkridge residents suffered carbon monoxide poisoning had a working carbon monoxide detector. Fire officials say several residents had made their way out of the home by the time Howard County and Baltimore County rescue units arrived just before midnight Saturday. The seven were reported in stable condition Sunday after being taken to the University of Maryland Medical Center. – AP

Baltimore Sun:

Officials praised the fact that the home had a working carbon monoxide detector.

“As in this case, a working carbon monoxide detector can mean the difference between life and death,” Howard County Fire Chief William F. Goddard III said.

Heating and cooking equipment that burn fuel can be sources of carbon monoxide.


Carbon Monoxide – A Clear, Odorless Gas That Goes Virtually Undetected

October 5th, 2010 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Chimneys, Consumer Protection, Family Safety, Fireplaces & Woodstoves, Furnaces, Installed Systems, Water Heaters | No Comments »

Author: Maria Richmond for HomeSafe.com

It has no smell, nor can you see carbon monoxide, yet it is very dangerous and kills several hundred people each year.

Carbon monoxide is produced by fuel burning appliances such as, gas space heaters, gas furnaces, wood burning stoves, fireplaces, gas dryers, gas ranges, ovens, even your car. If your appliance is working properly, it will not produce enough carbon monoxide to be harmful. If it is not functioning properly, carbon monoxide can leak from the appliance in amounts that can be harmful, even fatal if enough is inhaled.

Carbon monoxide is absorbed through the bloodstream. Carbon monoxide in the bloodstream makes it impossible for oxygen to be absorbed by your vital organs. When your organs are unable to have access to, nor able to utilize oxygen, they starve and become unable to function.

Children and pregnant women (the fetus) are at even greater risks of CO poisoning. Children naturally have a higher metabolic rate. This means that they require higher amounts of oxygen for their vital organs, like their hearts and brain. When CO interferes with the delivery of oxygen to these vital organs, children can suffer severe complications from CO poisoning, such as brain damage and death.

Read the rest of the article…


Carbon Monoxide Detectors – Proper Placement of Carbon Monoxide CO Detectors Important

September 30th, 2010 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Chimneys, Consumer Protection, Family Safety, Fireplaces & Woodstoves, Furnaces, Installed Systems, Poisoning, Water Heaters | No Comments »

WASHINGTON, Sept. 30 /PRNewswire/ — Proper placement of a carbon monoxide (CO) detector is important, reminds the makers of home-safety and security website HomeSafe.com (http://www.homesafe.com/coalert).

Each fall the sad news of another family that has one or more of its family members perish in their sleep from carbon monoxide poisoning repeats itself.

The real tragedy is that these deaths can be prevented if the family had the chimney checked and/or installed carbon monoxide detectors near the sleeping and living areas within the house.

If you are installing only one carbon monoxide detector, the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) recommends it be located near the sleeping area, where it can wake you if you are asleep. Additional detectors on every level and in every bedroom of a home provide extra protection against carbon monoxide poisoning.

Homeowners should remember not to install carbon monoxide detectors directly above or beside fuel-burning appliances, as appliances may emit a small amount of carbon monoxide upon start-up. A detector should not be placed within fifteen feet of heating or cooking appliances or in or near very humid areas such as bathrooms.

When considering where to place a carbon monoxide detector, keep in mind that although carbon monoxide is roughly the same weight as air (carbon monoxide’s specific gravity is 0.9657, as stated by the EPA; the National Resource Council lists the specific gravity of air as one), it may be contained in warm air coming from combustion appliances such as home heating equipment. If this is the case, carbon monoxide will rise with the warmer air.

Installation locations vary by manufacturer. Manufacturers’ recommendations differ to a certain degree based on research conducted with each one’s specific detector. Therefore, make sure to read the provided installation manual for each detector before installing.

For more information about carbon monoxide poisoning prevention and to find top-rated CO detectors for your home, visit the CO ALERT at http://www.homesafe.com/coalert.


Summer Time Chore – Check Your Furnace Chimney

July 19th, 2010 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Chimneys, Energy Efficiency, Poisoning | No Comments »

With record-breaking heat waves baking much of the country, it seems like an odd time to be thinking about your furnace or it’s chimney, but this is the season to get your furnace chimney checked by a qualified chimney sweep or furnace maintenance company. Failing to do so could cause carbon monoxide poisoning problems in a few short months when the weather turns chilly again.

Why is that?

In the spring many creatures large and small make their homes in fireplace and furnace flues, to nest or have their young in the relative comfort of the cool, quiet, and dark “cave” that is open on the roofs of many homes across the country. These creatures like birds, squirrels, raccoons and bats can bring a mess of nesting materials with them, or create a mess of droppings left behind, potentially clogging the chimney either at the top (with a bird nest) or at the bottom (near the thimble where your furnace connects).

What happens during the summer is that the young have grown, left the chimney, and left behind a potentially deadly situation for the people living in the home.

That nesting material, along with any other mess left behind, can reduce the ability of your chimney to exhaust the deadly carbon monoxide fumes generated from your furnace or non-electric water-heater. (Hint: If your furnace or water-heater uses fuel like natural gas, propane, or oil – then it creates carbon monoxide.)

If the chimney flue is partially blocked, then the odorless but dangerous carbon monoxide can escape into the home. In the worst-cases, the mess left behind may actually block the chimney completely, causing all of the carbon monoxide to dump into the home, possibly building to concentrations high enough to cause death.

Read the Rest…


Fire safety for your family

February 26th, 2010 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Chimneys, Consumer Protection, Family Safety, Fire Safety, Fireplaces & Woodstoves | No Comments »

Source: Children’s Hospital Boston – by LOIS LEE, MD, MPH

The city of Boston recently celebrated the fact that no citizens within the city died as a result of a house fire in 2009—the first year with no deaths since 1972, when the Fire Department started keeping records about fire-related deaths. It seems to me in 2010 that deaths from house fires should be a phenomenon of an earlier century, but sadly this is not true.

With some of the older type of housing and the various types of heating devices families use to survive the long New England winters, this is an important fact to celebrate. The use of space heaters, the presence of old electrical wiring and living with persons who smoke in the home all increase the risk of a house fire.

Read the Rest


Doggies fans, sick of their club being kicked around

January 27th, 2010 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Chimneys, Family Safety, Fire Safety, Fireplaces & Woodstoves, Workplace Safety | 1 Comment »

like the defiance and aggression. Even football people at other clubs can understand their motivation. “They had to do something,” is another comment I’ve heard several times since Wednesday, when the Giants performed the mother of all recruiting backflips, in response to the Bulldogs’ Boyd Ultimatum (we’ll take Boyd and no one else).

There would be some sort of small flat topped pyramid in the center of the court and surrounding grounds and the King would step up to the top. He announced the winning team and captain. Then he climbed down and strode over to a spherical rock. More than two decades, the NFL has been a leader in addressing the issue of head Wholesale Discount NBA Jerseys injuries in a serious way. Important steps have included major investments in independent medical research; improved medical protocols and benefits, innovative partnerships with the CDC, NIH, GE and others to accelerate progress. NFL Wholesale Discount football Jerseys China just this year reached a $765 million concussion settlement that would provide money for medical exams, concussion related compensation for NFL retirees, and their families.

That’s just the tip of the iceberg for Kirsch. “You need to have that infrastructure solidly in place to do all these things. With our robust Wi Fi network, we are confident that we can launch our new Game Day app and know that we will not disappoint the 68,000 people at Gillette Stadium,”Cheap NFL Jerseys says Kirsch.

In almost all cases, these costs are so high that, compared to the cost of Discount MLB Jerseys Free Shipping individual airline tickets, they make no economic sense. Even the most intrepid traveler who flies 52 weeks out of the year would spend at most $2,000 per week ($104,000 per year) on airline travel. That amount of money would not even cover the cost of the pilot, not to mention the cost of the plane, fuel, maintenance, support, etc.

Police said the 19 year old performer fell about 30 feet from his apparatus on Oct. 31 and landed in the crowd. A witness told The Philadelphia Inquirer that he bounced off a safety net then landed among the spectators. Concussions used to be described as a brain bruise, but doctors now like to say that it’s a problem with the brain’s function, a problem that can’t be detected by MRI or CT scan. When the brain suddenly slams to a stop, the Cheap Wholesale Baseball Jerseys From China brain’s neurons all fire at once. That surge of energy temporarily messes up the brain’s electrical and chemical signal system, making it hard to think straight..

This amid so much attention to the long term effects on the health of players. The university says it’s taking steps to prevent incidents like that from Wholesale hockey Jerseys Free Shipping happening again. And we have a report this morning from Quinn Klinefelter of member station WDET.


Home Safety Appliances: Carbon Monoxide Detectors

January 2nd, 2010 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Chimneys, Family Safety, Furnaces | No Comments »

Inside this article, you will learn how serious that danger of Carbon Monoxide can be at home and at work. It is recognized as a serious health hazard, responsible for more deaths than any other form of poisoning around the world Carbon Monoxide (CO) especially dangerous because it is a combination of Carbon and Oxygen that cannot be seen, smelled, or tasted. On average, in the United States death from CO poisoning averages nearly 170 annually.

The final outcome of inhaling CO is oxygen-starvation of the body’s internal organs. As CO is taken into the lungs, it unites to the hemoglobin far more rapidly than oxygen can. This results in the failure of internal organs, as they become starved for enough oxygen to work properly. Early warning signs of poisoning include headaches, fatigue and nausea, all of which can easily be mistaken for influenza.

Read the rest…


Winter Storm: Weather outside frightful, make inside home delightful

December 10th, 2009 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Chimneys, Family Safety, Fireplaces & Woodstoves | No Comments »

Source: Orlando Examiner

With the current winter storm sweeping the nation already responsible for at least a dozen deaths, it’s not surprising people are seeking refuge in their warm homes.

But when the weather turns cold outside, things can heat up inside — sometimes a little too much, if you don’t take precautions.

Dumping nearly 20 inches of the white stuff on Madison WI, and 15 more in Green Bay, the year’s first major pre-winter snow storm swept a large portion of the U.S. this week, leaving Wisconsin in a state of emergency.

As the winter storm moved off the East Coast, it left in its wake the return of “lake effect” snow bands, lingering blustery conditions and frigid temperatures.

On Wednesday, a follow-up storm was approaching from the West, where temperatures have been lower than normal — including a record 16-degree reading in Redding, CA.

Winter storm conditions blanketing much of the nation comes with a triple-threat to household health and safety — issues related to carbon monoxide poisoning, home heating and power outages, according to the Home Safety Council.

However, while you can’t change Mother nature, you can change behavior to keep the home safe when winter blasts howl around your home.

Read the rest


How to avoid carbon-monoxide poisoning

February 5th, 2009 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Chimneys, Fireplaces & Woodstoves, Furnaces, Poisoning | 1 Comment »

Some timely safety advice from Consumer Reports:

Last week’s hospitalization of more than a dozen children in Dallas and the recent deaths of seven Kentucky residents illustrate the real dangers of carbon monoxide.

Keep your family safe with the safety measures below as well as this advice.

Read the rest and see the safety video.


Consumer Reports Risk Survey: 48% of Americans Don’t Have Carbon-Monoxide Detectors

February 5th, 2009 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Energy Efficiency, Food & Nutrition, Home Projects, Slip-and-Fall | No Comments »

YONKERS, N.Y., Feb. 2 — PRNewswire-USNewswire — Some 48 percent of Americans don’t have a carbon-monoxide detector at home, 24 percent sometimes fail to fasten a seatbelt, and 39 percent often eat raw dough when making cookies, according to a nationally representative poll of 1,000 Americans conducted by the Consumer Reports National Research Center.

This is the second part of a two-part series that looks at risky behavior. The first half was published in the February 2009 issue of Consumer Reports.

The poll reveals what behaviors Americans do which they probably shouldn’t including: occasionally using the top step of a ladder (31 percent), sometimes having a beer while using a power tool or mower (13 percent), and letting their kids play on a trampoline (43 percent).

Also, the survey shows what behaviors Americans don’t do that they probably should including: having a rubber mat in the tub or shower (61 percent don’t), changing batteries in smoke alarms yearly (21 percent don’t), and eating burgers only well done (32 percent don’t).

The full report on how often Americans take risks is available in the March 2009 issue of Consumer Reports, on saleFebruary 3 and online at www.ConsumerReports.org.

The results are revealing because these behaviors can cause real harm, according to safety experts at Consumer Reports and elsewhere.

  • According to the National Highway Traffic Administration, safety belts saved 15,147 lives in 2007.
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that carbon-monoxide poisoning claims almost 500 lives in the U.S. each year.
  • The CDC notes that a common cause of food-borne salmonella infections is under-cooked or raw eggs, often found in cookie dough. Salmonellosis causes an estimated 1.4 million cases of foodborne illness and more than 500 deaths annually in the United States.
  • Based on Consumer Reports’ analysis of Consumer Product Safety Commission data, more than 105,000 hospital-treated injuries in the U.S. in 2007 were linked to trampolines.

The poll revealed men were slightly more likely than women to let children play on a trampoline, and women were more apt to eat burgers well done, fasten their safety belt religiously, and clean lint from the dryer after each use. Respondents ages 18 to 35 were more likely than older folks to eat raw cookie dough; those 55 and older were more likely to have a rubber mat in the tub or shower.

The Consumer Reports National Research Center conducted a random-digit-dialing telephone survey of a nationally representative probability sample of telephone households. In all, 1,000 interviews were completed among adults aged 18+. Interviews took place in October 2008. The margin of error is +/- 3% points at a confidence level of 95 percent.

MARCH 2009

The material above is intended for legitimate news entities only; it may not be used for commercial or promotional purposes. Consumer Reports(R) is published by Consumers Union, an expert, independent nonprofit organization whose mission is to work for a fair, just, and safe marketplace for all consumers and to empower consumers to protect themselves. To achieve this mission, we test, inform, and protect. To maintain our independence and impartiality, Consumers Union accepts no outside advertising, no free test samples, and has no agenda other than the interests of consumers. Consumers Union supports itself through the sale of our information products and services, individual contributions, and a few noncommercial grants.


What is Carbon Monoxide?

January 20th, 2009 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide | No Comments »

Carbon Monoxide is the leading cause of accidental poisoning deaths in America, according to the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). 1,500 people die annually due to accidental carbon monoxide exposure, and additional 10,000 seek medical attention. (Medical experts agree that it's difficult to estimate the total number of carbon monoxide incidents because the symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning resemble so many other common ailments.)

Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless, tasteless toxic gas produced during incomplete combustion of fuel - Natural Gas, Oil, Coal, Wood, Kerosene, etc.

During normal combustion, each atom of carbon in the burning fuel joins with two atoms of oxygen - forming a harmless gas called carbon dioxide. When there is a lack of oxygen to ensure complete combustion of the fuel, each atom of carbon links up with only one atom of oxygen - forming carbon monoxide gas.

What is the danger to me?

Carbon monoxide inhibits the blood's capacity to carry oxygen. In out lungs, CO quickly passes into our bloodstream and attaches itself to hemoglobin (oxygen carrying pigment in red blood cells). Hemoglobin readily accepts carbon monoxide - even over the life giving oxygen atoms (as much as 200 times as readily as oxygen) forming a toxic compound known as carboxyhemoglobin (COHb).

By replacing oxygen with carbon monoxide in our blood, our bodies poison themselves by cutting off the needed oxygen to our organs and cells, causing various amounts of damage - depending on exposure.

Low levels of carbon monoxide poisoning (with COHb levels of 10%) result in symptoms commonly mistaken for common flu and cold symptoms - shortness of breath on mild exertion, mild headaches, nausea.

With higher levels of poisoning (COHb levels of 30%) the symptoms become more severe - dizziness, mental confusion, severe headaches, nausea, fainting on mild exertion.

At high levels (CHOb of 50% or more) there may be unconsciouses and death.

How does CO enter the home?

Carbon monoxide can escape from any fuel-burning appliance, furnace, water heater, fireplace, woodstove, or space heater.

Most newer homes are built very air-tight, thus cutting down on the supply of fresh air to your furnace - and creating an oxygen starved flame. Tight closing replacement windows and doors, as well as additional insulation can cause similar problems in older homes.

Carbon monoxide can spill from vent connections in poorly maintained or blocked chimneys. If the flue liner is cracked or deteriorated, CO can seep through the liner and into the house - slowly creeping up to dangerous levels. If a nest or other materials restrict or block the flue, CO will mostly spill back into the house.

Improperly sized flues connected to new high-efficiency furnaces and water heaters can also contribute to CO spillage. (Many new furnaces and water heaters are installed using the existing chimneys which may be the wrong size to allow the furnace to vent properly.)

Warming up vehicles in an attached garage, even with the garage door opened, can allow concentrated amounts of CO to enter your home through the car port door or near-by windows.

What to do in a CO emergency.

If you are suffering from chronic flu-like symptoms, see your doctor and ask him if it could be a low-level CO poisoning.

If you have a CO detector, and it alarms, open windows and ventilate your home w/ fresh air, have your heating system checked by a professional.

If your alarm sounds and you are feeling drowsy or dizzy, leave the house and call 911 from your neighbors home. You may need medical attention for CO poisoning.


Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Danger Increases as Record Low Temps Decend Over America

January 16th, 2009 | Filed under: Carbon Monoxide, Chimneys, Fireplaces & Woodstoves, Furnaces, Installed Systems, Poisoning | Tags: , , | No Comments »

America’s suffering a deep freeze this weekend – and the risk of carbon monoxide related poisoning climbs as people try to stay warm. Much of America is unprepared for such low temperatures, with rarely-used and poorly maintained heating systems, chimneys clogged with debris or birds nests, or dead batteries in their carbon monoxide detectors. Others will try dangerous methods to stay warm, methods like using auxiliary heaters indoors.

According to JAMA, carbon monoxide is the leading cause of poisoning deaths in America. Carbon monoxide is odorless, colorless, and cannot be detected by people without the use of carbon monoxide detectors.

Carbon monoxide is a by-product of combustion, present whenever fuel is burned. It is produced by common household appliances such as gas or oil furnaces, clothes dryers, water heaters, ovens and ranges. A charcoal grill operating in an enclosed area, a fire burning in a fireplace or a car running in an attached garage also produce carbon monoxide.

How Does Carbon Monoxide Poison?

CO combines with hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying agent in the red blood cells. When oxygen is robbed from the brain and other organs, death can result. In addition, up to 40 percent of survivors of severe CO poisoning develop memory impairment and other serious illnesses.

Many cases of reported carbon monoxide poisoning indicate that victims are aware they are not well but become so disoriented that they are unable to save themselves.

But what do you do and who to you call when your carbon monoxide detector goes into alarm? The manufacturer of First Alert®, the leading brand of carbon monoxide detectors, recommends the following:

If the alarm goes off, turn off appliances, or other sources of combustion at once. Immediately get fresh air into the premises by opening doors and windows. Call a qualified technician and have the problem fixed before restarting appliances. If anyone is experiencing symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning: headaches, dizziness, vomiting, call the fire department and immediately move to a location that has fresh air. Do a head count to be sure all persons are accounted for. Do not re-enter the premises until it has been aired out and the problem corrected.

This weekend stay safe, err on the side of caution. Carbon Monoxide Detectors are available at most hardware stores and retailers like WalMart, Target, Home Depot, Lowes, Ace Hardware, etc. They generally cost between $20 to $40 each – the more expensive ones have a digital readout to give you a real-time and highest-recorded PPM reading.